FITNESS FITNESS

jueves, 07 de febrero del 2019
Pierre calienta motores con las pesas
Pierre Vinet ha vivido toda su vida en Quebec, la zona francesa de Canadá. Su desarrollo y exposición en el mundo del Fitness y Bodybuilding ha sido en su natal Montreal.

Hizo estudios post graduados en Human Biomechanics; es un duro en deportes de combate, en especial Judo y TaeKwonDo; fue finalista en competencia Mr. Canada de fisiculturismo; y es defensor de la participación de la mujer en los deportes relacionados a levantamiento de pesas.

Su amor por las pesas comenzó con un regalo que le hizo un tío cuando a penas tenía 7 de edad.

Su porciento de grasa corporal es de tan sólo 8 %, y asegura que el progreso muscular no se ve durante la rutina de ejercicios, sino durante la etapa de recuperación y descanso..

Los invito a conocer sobre uno de los propulsores del Fitness más respetado en Canadá y el universo de las redes sociales, Pierre Vinet, en exclusiva con QuePalo.com ..



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«« HÉCTOR VÁZQUEZ MUÑIZ, QuePalo.com »»

What University did you attend, and what did you major in?

« PIERRE VINET, FITNESS PROFESSIONAL & WEIGHT LIFTER / CANADA »

"I graduated in Biochemistry at the Université du Québec à Montreal, then followed with Post Graduate (Masters) Studies in Human Biomechanics (specializing in deadlift) at Université de Montréal. However, my academic and overall studies begun way before and continue today...

Just to show how early I started and how much a simple gesture can change someone’s life, I received from an uncle my first set of barbell and weights at the age of 7, immediately begun lifting as well as reading about it, and never stopped since. Additionally, at the age of 8, a dietician (nutrition specialist) came in our school classroom to teach us the various food categories as well as explain how sugar and other nutritionally empty food can hinder health. This was enough for me to immediately decide to stop eating cakes, sugar as well as fast food, and never return...

At that same age, my understanding level of nutrition as well as my commitment to eat well and adopting a healthy lifestyle convinced my mom to give me the exclusive right to choose whether I would eat what’s on the family table or prepare myself a healthier meal. I must forever thank my mom, who since past away, for having trusted my judgement and supported me in my decision to take ownership of my health and lifestyle. From then on, I continued devouring every book I could get my hands on, but let’s face it… science was then much less advanced, and information even less accessible. Internet didn’t exist, and local libraries did not carry scientific journals. Nonetheless, I always did my best to seek and read everything I could find, as well as – most importantly – act upon it..

Eventually, I got to college, where I studied and graduated in both, Pure & Applied Sciences as well as in Human Health Sciences at the same time, because I chose all science classes, except the two weight lifting classes I also chose, instead of irrelevant subjects as optional courses. I remember already being so involved with health and fitness at the time, that I was the only student allowed by my physical education teacher not to do the same as everyone. I simply showed up my own training calendar and plan (which I had been designing myself since the age of 11, at the same time I invented my first home weight lifting machine), and the teacher gave me not only the right to do it instead of her usual program, but also gave me the keys to every gymnasium room in the college so that I could access whatever infrastructure I needed. At that time, every gym teacher in the college knew me and let me enter their classroom or gymnasium - while they were giving their class – to use whatever material I needed…

Many were already considering me a wizard of fitness, and several teachers were even asking me advices for their own trainings or classes. I must admit that this was an exciting time, because not only I could execute all I believed to be optimal for my health and fitness, but I also had access to all needed infrastructure and was even praised for my past and present personal investment in the matter. Nutrition was always one of the topics which interested me the most, thus why I also took several (all available) classes un nutrition in both college and University...

Since I graduated, I always tried to stay on top of emerging science and kept taking several courses as well as reading scientific articles and books (roughly 1 book per week, for the last several years). This ultimately amounts to lots of information, and my biggest challenge are to remember and integrate everything I learn, and to put it in practice for myself as well as for the people I help in my health and fitness professional career."





«« HVM »»

Tell me about your sports background before choosing Fitness / Body Building

« PIERRE VINET »

"As mentioned earlier, I have practiced weight lifting since the age of 8, but I had also done other sports (including swimming) for as long as I can remember. Martial arts were particularly a passion. I first started judo at the age of 7 and continued for the following 6 years – winning my first 17 competitions and 50 first fights by ipon (perfect score). I was especially gifted in it and should have probably continued...

However, at the age of 11, I also started taekwondo (I was then actively practicing 3 different sports – weight lifting, judo, and taekwondo). However, my taekwondo instructor felt I had so much potential in this sport, that he asked that I stop judo to better focus in his sport. Although I wish I explored all my potential in judo (sport I still love today), I will never regret having committed to my taekwondo sport career. My taekwondo instructor had a military like teaching style, which very well matched my disciplined spirit and my great health and fitness ambition..

Ultimately, I became a Kukkiwon World Taekwondo black belt at the age of 14, an 8 consecutive year state champion, and eventually an International Championship quarter finalist. In my mind, I was first and foremost an achievement hungry athlete. However, my instructor wanted me to help the sport grow, which lead me to become the worlds’ youngest International referee at 21, a 5th degree black belt and Master at only 22, and to become President of the State Taekwondo Coaching Committee as well, Director of the National Taekwondo Coaching Committee as well as the Author of the National Taekwondo Instructing Certification Manual and Program at 23. Sadly, all these challenges added to my University studies and my student jobs weighted a lot on my shoulders and limited the time I could invest in my own training...

So, giving to the sports, going to school, working and taking care of my little apartment probably negatively affect my development in the two sports (Taekwondo and Weight Lifting) I simultaneously practiced. By now, you probably have noticed that martial arts occupied a large portion of my life in my early life. However, although I didn’t compete in bodybuilding, Olympic lifting or any variation of weight lifting until later, my passion for weight lifting never stopped to grow and I had never stopped lifting. So much so that, at the age of 17, I was consistently lifting weights twice per day, six days per week."



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«« HVM »»

How do you call what you do: Fitness Modeling & Coaching, or Body Building?

« PIERRE VINET »

"It is noteworthy to mention that from the age of 7 until the age of 17, I only lifted weights, although extremely seriously, for health and strength – not for physical appearance. Surprisingly, I only started to pay attention to my look (and to women) from then on. Happily, by then, I already had an insane physique – in fact, I have had my six packs abs since the age of 10, and never lost it...

From the age of 18 until 23, my main sport focus shifted from martial arts to weights, and although I remained State Taekwondo champion for several years to come, I mostly trained and focused on my weight lifting and related diet. From the age of 18 until the age of 23, I was totally dedicated to my training and diet, so much so, that I didn’t eat a single bad thing during this entire period – and when I mean not a single thing, I mean not only no fast food (which I have never eaten anyway), but not even muffin, a yogurt or a gum. I was somewhat a little nuts LOL..

I can remember my teachers commenting on the fact that I was bringing and eating stinking egg whites during my bachelor program or master in biomechanics courses. My main goal was always health and athletic ability, which is somehow connected to my physical development. For this reason, I never trained just to do my reps or sets, but always to surpass myself. I have also always been forward acting with my findings and committed to my decisions, so much so, that it almost made me an unpopular teenager. Who likes to be around someone who always puts duty before fun?...

I have never smoke and hardly ever ate sweetened or fast food, and you can forget me in if you’re seeking for a alcohol drinking partner – I simply don’t drink. This might seem admirable, but really, when I was a kid and teenager, health and fitness were not in style. I simply looked like an alien to most and was not praised for my efforts. I remember one of my teenager friends’ reaction when I declined a beer he offered – He asked, in front of everyone – what do you eat? Yoghurt and herbs? Thank god I didn’t reply that dairy products were not so healthy, or I would simply have worsened my case. Fortunately, I the fact that I was pretty good looking, somewhat smart in school and known to be a martial artist probably discouraged many to bully me. This doesn’t mean that I was totally immune to this scourge...

I can very well remember that from the age of 13 until 16, the bad boys in our school did not appreciate my growing popularity and gathered to threaten to collectively beat me if I was too loud. This led me to isolation I am still unsure whether it prevented me from becoming a leader earlier on or helped me to focus on my goals and stay away from the distraction of popularity. To answer your question more precisely, I would describe myself as a health and fitness passionate. Because I was always attracted to maximal achievement, I must admit that I was more interested by bodybuilding than fitness..

However, I must also admit that, although I have learned and still have the ability to quickly grow in size, I was always more genetically gifted for fitness, due to my natural symmetry and constant condition (leanness). I must also add that during my several first years of weight lifting, bodybuilding wasn’t popular, and fitness modeling and competition were literally non-existing. Therefore, I never did it for public recognition – as I sometimes say, I was there before the sport was popular, and will still be there if its popularity fades. Finally, if I would only focus on fitness modeling or recognition, I probably would have taken other drastic and unhealthy measures many take to climb the fitness ladder. Also, although I did have my share of experience with various performance aids, I quickly realized that cheating and taking unhealthy drastic measures would significantly hinder my health and longevity...

The reason I mention about longevity is that the science of longevity as well as the goal of having a longer health span were always my two primary focuses – anything and everything else was almost accessory. In fact, during the last 5 years, nearly half of my readings are in the sciences of longevity, another significant portion are related to health (whether on nutrition, epigenetics, autoimmune disorders, cancer and human physiology in general), and probably less than 25% on exercise."



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«« HVM »»

Is it worth the sacrifice, all those hours in the gym, plus diet?

« PIERRE VINET »

"Many successful athletes would probably tell you that all those training, nutrition and lifestyle efforts are worth the sacrifice. However, I don’t really see it that way for myself. The weird thing is that, having started this young, I have never really lived otherwise. The healthy lifestyle is the only way I know and what makes me happy. On the very odd occasion I cheat (with pastas or a pizza slice), I nearly always don’t feel so great after having done it...

As for the training, pushing myself to my limits (and I don’t only mean to merely lift weights), is like a drug for me. You can’t ask me to lie under a bar and only take a light weight, unless you ask me to lift it a hundred times, or something like it. Pushing myself to my limits is a need for me, it is what I like to do, and even more so in vacations – when nothing stops me to be the best I can. On the other hand, I would say that the life change and sacrifices that my athletes (several of which became Professional athletes, national or even International champions) were worth effort."


«« HVM »»

How do you see women doing weight lifting and competing in Fitness contest?

« PIERRE VINET »

"I have two views, as an individual and as a coach - both of which are compatible. As an individual, I was brought up in a world where bodybuilding and fitness athletes were virtually nonexistent. I had seen them in magazine and must admit that was admiring as much as desiring them. However, I learned to also like different types of physiques – short, tall, slim or athletic/muscular (although the latter was very rare). Since the explosion in popularity of female fitness, I have also coached several athletes, and highly value both bodybuilding and fitness looks..

Lately, a very curvy look (featuring extremely large glutes and somewhat curvy legs) also grew in popularity, and again, this is something I am very comfortable as an individual and as a coach. However, with regards to my personal life, what matters the most is the overall physical beauty and especially the mind and spirit/soul of the person.".


«« HVM »»

When you see yourself at a mirror, what do you see?

« PIERRE VINET »

"Ha! Ha! This is a good one! It depends on the days. But I stopped weighing myself years ago. I only do it occasionally or when I prepare for a competition (the last one was my 6th, where I got a podium for the second time in bodybuilding at the National Championship). Most of the time, I try to focus on my health and general condition...

My bodyweight can fluctuate by almost 20 lbs depending on how much I train and eat, but I never let my bodyfat go higher than 8% (where I can see all my 8 abdominals, my obliques as well as my chest, quadriceps and shoulders striations). I also have a professional career, so my time has to be well managed and divided between my fitness passion, and my career, and sometimes, my shape takes the back seat to allow me raising the bar in my career. Nonetheless, it’s always a question of time, as I always come back in equally great shape."



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«« HVM »»

What’s your advice to a gym junkie that wants to make Fitness Modeling and Coaching, or Bodybuilding, his professional job for living?

« PIERRE VINET »

"My advices are: Learn about social networking and marketing. Study your market and find a niche. Learn to give in order to receive, and don’t discourage yourself. It is a very competitive market, but if you are consistent, and do the right moves, you can be as popular as necessary to make a living. Also, remember that popularity is not the ultimate goal in a career – you need to be popular with the right audience, for the right reason and you also need to know how to give your fans what they want in order to be able to monetize from it."


«« HVM »»

How is your daily / weekly gym routine?

« PIERRE VINET »

"That is a very complex question. I would like to share much of my knowledge with you all. But, as an example, the fitness courses or seminars I give generally last at least 8 to 24 hours, and those only cover a portion of what I believe is needed to fully understand the essentials in health and fitness and to design your own or anyone else’s training program and nutritional plan..

Nonetheless, I can share with you a few key principles: The principle of training is the application of a stress which disturbs the body in such a way that it not only repairs but improves (adapt) The improvement is also called the over compensation. Also, the body will only adapt itself if necessary and to the amount necessary. This adaptation is specific and proportional to the stress level in comparison to the original tolerance (fitness) level. The stress level is the combination of the stress intensity and volume, and the cumulative stress created by training frequency will lead to compounded overcompensation or gains..

Another key point is that the body does not mainly improve during the workout, but rather during the recovery period following the workout. Therefore, recovery is an essential and key part of the plan and encompasses both nutrition and rest. The amount of stress (intensity and volume) as well as the needed rest during each session depends on the targeted physical quality (strength, endurance, etc.) as well as the fitness level of the athlete and its environment (work, quality of sleep, etc.) and must be properly evaluated by a knowledgeable person to maximize gains. Otherwise, it is easy not to stress enough or to train too much. Generally speaking, we follow two principles: progressive overload, and alternation between phases of high work load and lower work loads...

There is much more I could say, but this is only to mention that there are several factors to properly design a training plan, and this training plan will greatly vary depending on the individual as well as for the same individual depending on its current level of fitness, its environment as well as its goals and current exhaustion/fatigue level. This is also true for me, which means that there is not a single program I do at all time. Nonetheless, I will still mention that I generally try to go all out, and push as much as I can, as long as I can, and as often as I can. Most of the time, the problem isn’t people training too much, but rather the opposite or them lacking consistency or continuity/progression."


VIDEO Pierre en Judo, Taekwondo y BodyBuilding




«« HVM »»

How important is supplementation, and which one do you use (carb blockers, CLA, L Carnitine, Proteins, etc.?

« PIERRE VINET »

"I used to spend a large share of my income to purchase dietary supplements. This is no longer true. I believe that most NUTRIENTS you NEED are present in an adequate diet. This does not mean that supplemental vitamins and minerals as well as other nutrients such as omega-3 cannot help by filling the needs not met by nutrition (most food available today are grown in imbalanced environment and lack certain nutrients, so using vitamin supplements is definitely a plus for health in general, and health is needed to maximize performance and physique)..

Aside from food, I often use nutritional concentrates such as whey or vegan protein powder (I recently switched to veganism for health, ethical, environmental and even economical reasons), as well as dextrose and maltodextrin sugars to replenish my muscle glycogen storage and prevent insulin resistance caused by hypoglycemia typical to post workout period..

I also sometimes add L-Leucine (to trigger muscle growth through the mTOR anabolic pathway - although a constant activation of the mTOR metabolic pathway can lead to aging) and creatine. I also own a sport’s supplement company, WARMEDS, with my life-long friend Mike, and believe that our products are both revolutionary and extremely effective to increase anabolism and improve overall performance."


«« HVM »»

Are sex and exercise related… The more exercise the better sex?

« PIERRE VINET »

"I wouldn’t say that exercise directly leads to better sex, but I would definitely say that improved health and fitness condition is necessary for optimal endocrine (hormones) functions and sexual health. I usually keep my sex life to myself, but I can state that staying healthy and fit allow me to not only attract the people I was interested to, but also have a great sexual life."


«« HVM »»

Besides weight lifting, what cardio exercise do you recommend the most?

« PIERRE VINET »

"I recommend doing sports that are both fun and challenging. If you do not compete in any specific cardio vascular sport, I recommend to vary in order to create diversity, stimulate your body in multiple ways, and also to keep yourself challenged."

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